RED FLAGS BERMUDA:

AT-A-GLANCE REFeRence GUIDE

Early Identification of Red Flags in Child Development: Birth to Age Six

HOW TO USE THIS RESOURCE

*

ALTERNATIVE

STEP 

Talking to Parents/Caregivers about concerns

(for health care or early years professionals)

CLICK HERE to learn more

1

Find the area of interest or concern you wish to know more information about.

CLICK ON A BOX BELOW

STEP ONE

2

On the topic page, find the age of the child you wish to know more information about.

NOTE: not all areas are age specific

 

STEP TWO

3

Closest age without going over: If the child is between the age levels (e.g., 2 years, 2 mos.) check the lower age range for Red Flags (e.g., 2 years)

STEP THREE

4

Read through the list and identify if the child is demonstrating any of the Red Flags at their age level. Click on any buttons or links for more information

STEP FOUR

5

Red Flags may be signs of delayed development. If you have concerns, contact a pediatrician family doctor, child and family services and other professionals referenced in the resource tables

STEP FIVE

Attachment & Relationships

Self Regulation

Prematurity

Sensory

Sleep

Fine Motor

Gross Motor

Vision

Hearing

Speech & Language

Behaviour

Social/Emotional

Nutrition

Feeding & Swallowing

Dental & Oral Health

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Domestic Violence

Physical Abuse

Sexual Abuse

Emotional Abuse

Neglect, Abandonment & Incapacity

Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder

Learning Disabilities

Intellectual & Developmental Disabilites

Attention Difficulties and/ or Hyperactive Behaviour

Mild Traumatic

Brain Injury

Family Environmental Stressors

Maternal Mental Illness

Resilience

Anxiety

Selective Mutism

Smoking

Kindergarten & School Readiness

Subsidy Information

Abuse Related Services - Table

Support Services - Table

Practitioners & Agencies - Table

Preschools & Nurseries - Table

Emergency Services & Reporting - Table

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RED FLAGS AT ANY STAGE

NOT ACHIEVING INDICATED DEVELOPMENTAL MILESTONES

STRONG PARENT CONCERNS

SIGNIFICANT LOSS OF SKILLS, LACK OF RESPONSE TO SOUND OR VISUAL STIMULI

POOR INTERACTION WITH ADULTS OR OTHER CHILDREN

DIFFERENCE BETWEEN RIGHT AND LEFT SIDES OF BODY IN STRENGTH, MOVEMENT OR TONE

LOOSE AND FLOPPY MOVEMENTS (LOW TONE) OR STIFF AND TENSE (HIGH TONE

HOW TO TALK TO PARENTS/
CAREGIVERS ABOUT CONCERNS


Sharing sensitive news


One of the most challenging issues for a health care or early years professional working with young children can be relaying concerns about a child’s health or development to a parent or caregiver. When a potential concern is identified, either by observation or screening, the family should be notified so that positive next steps can be taken. In these circumstances, effective communication is essential. It can be very difficult to relay these concerns to parents and caregivers; however, for a child to reach his or her full developmental potential, it is important to have these conversations. If concerns are presented in a positive and caring manner, this will build trust between the professional and the family.


Sharing sensitive news can be challenging both for the family and the person delivering the news. Upon receiving this information about their child, the parent/caregiver may react with a range of emotions including shock, anger, disbelief, fear and sometimes relief at having their observations and questions about their child acknowledged.


Although there is no single way that works best there are some things to keep in mind when addressing concerns with a family. The following framework will provide some tips and encouragement for sharing concerns in a clear, informative, and supportive manner:


Prepare for a successful conversation

  • Know the facts

  • Plan to meet face to face

  • Meet in a private location

  • Allow plenty of time without interruptions

Share the information

  • Begin by sharing the child’s strengths and positive behaviours

  • Ask the parents/caregivers what they know about their child’s development

  • Remember and remind parents/caregivers that they know their child best

  • Share observations/concerns that have been noted about the child’s development

  • Highlight the expected developmental milestones for the child’s age

  • Show concern and compassion

  • Explain the consequences of not taking action such as the wait and see approach

  • Explain the range of possibilities for supporting the child such as referral, assessment, intervention, etc.
     

Plan for next steps

  • Thank parents/caregivers for their support

  • Provide available resources for further reading and information

  • Ensure that your concerns have been documented and that there is a plan for follow-up action

  • Empower the parents/caregivers by enlisting their support to plan a course of action regarding next steps for their child

  • Allow time for questions and concerns by the parents/caregivers

  • Provide parents/caregivers with available resources such as brochures or contact information


Presenting information in this manner lends credibility to the concerns identified.